Toris Design Box

Browsing Tag:

Modern Neo-Classical style

    MIX DON’T MATCH

    The true and tested formula of mix don’t match is having a second coming. When decorating you may mix but you must also follow the basic rules of design or you may end up with a space that is more disharmony than distinctive. Restless rather than refreshing. Create a carefully curated space that looks effortless rather than a random mix that shows lack of planning and effort.  The essence is in the details.

    Mix Colors –

     Don’t try to match wall colors with the exact shades of the soft furnishings in the room with the artwork with the curtain fabric. It will end up looking either too insipid or trying too hard and failing to get an exact match. There is bound to be variations even if you select the same color.  When combining shades and tones of the same color within a space, the way each element reflects – or absorbs light – is crucial.

    What are tints, shades and tone?

    Adding white to a pure color creates a tint. Any of the basic twelve colors with pure white added to it produces a tint or pastel palette. Tints are softer and more subtle than the pure colors hence they are often associated with pastel.

    Adding black to a color creates shades. Shades can range from medium to very dark  depending on the amount of black added to the color. Black should always be added with caution because it can easily become overpowering. Increasing the contrast will also produce a deeper shade of a color.

    Adding black and white, or gray, to a pure color, creates tones of a color. Most of the colors we see in our world on a daily basis are tones of a pure color. Tones have the qualities of a pure color but are not as intense, because they are “toned down.” Be cognizant of the rules and stay within a tonal range.  

    Mix Styles –

    It is always a good idea to create an organic space with one dominant style and a healthy mix of one other style that is compatible but different from the original one. A study of multiple Parisian apartments confirms that a careful combination of styles results in a sophisticated yet livable space. Most European interiors are able to achieve this effortless yet stylish look by following this rule of design.

    'Many different styles - mix don't match

    A Mid-Century Modern room can breathe with one or two British Colonial Campaign style pieces of furniture and a room decorated in Hollywood Regency style will benefit hugely from a touch of the Modern Neoclassical. Art Deco can sometimes blend well with Modern or benefit from incorporating one or two items in an Eclectic Global style. Chinoiserie mixes well with French Toile.   

    Mix Finishes –

    I get a lot of questions from clients enquiring about if and when to combine different wood finishes within a room and how to do it successfully. When it comes to kitchens there seems to be some confusion about whether it is a good idea to combine countertop and backsplash materials and finishes. Same with how and when to combine different materials for the vanity, the shower walls and flooring in bathroom remodels

    Mix textures –

    This is a must if you want to create a room that is interesting – as opposed to blah – as well as restful. For a room that also looks updated and high end as opposed to dated or cheap mix don’t match textures

    Many textures - Mix don't match

    A well designed room such as the one above will have a combination of gloss with matte and showcase textures such as glass, metal, raffia, wicker and fabric mixed in together.

    Mix scales –

    I always tell my clients that small sized rooms benefit from substantial pieces of furniture. Conversely, in large rooms one can introduce multiple small items of furniture mixed in with larger pieces. Smaller pieces that might otherwise make a small room appear tinny or busy. Here again it is important to remember the rules of design so as not to get lost in the how and how big is too big and how many small pieces might one add in a large room?

    Mix patterns –

    This step is tricky! Before executing this step do a quick study of how the different patterns react to one another.  

    Do plaids work with florals?  How does a paisley print relate to a geometric pattern? Would a sofa covered in a fabric with blush cabbage roses on an off white background work well against a dark green palm leaf pattern wallpaper. Or can I choose the same wallpaper in an ecru shade …..and make it work….etc etc.

    Pattern mix bedroom

    Photo credits –

    Mixing colors – image of Living Room in mix don’t match shades of gray and yellow courtesy Elledecor.com ~  Style mix – ëclectic Living Room with gate leg table and modern accent chairs courtesy Lonny.com ~ Mixing finishes – image of earth tone living room – courtesy ballardesigns.com – Texture mix – photo of David Netto-created Connecticut dining room courtesy Verandah.com ~ Different Scales – image of bi-level living room with white sectional sofa courtesy Goodhousekeeping.com ~ Pattern Mix – courtesy Architecturaldigest.com

    Category
    Home
    Discussion
    Share on

    3 Most Popular European Styles

    The 3 most popular European styles by far are Haussmann, Modern Neo-Classical and Scandinavian, not necessarily in that order. Modern European interior design is a mix of traditional and contemporary design. Contemporary European interiors are understated, with a focus on tactile and natural materials such as wicker, wood, metal, and natural stone.

    The Haussmann Style

    One of the 3 Most Popular European Styles is Haussmann. Between 1853 and 1870, the private Paris townhouses, the last remains of the 18th century, were starting to make way for rental investment properties, giving rise to a more diverse Paris. To redesign the 175 kilometres of roads that run through the heart of Paris, Baron Haussmann was called in for a project which established an architectural style that is distinctively Parisian. 

    3 most popular European styles - Haussmann, Modern Neo-Classical and Scandinavian

    By the time Haussmann completed his project, narrow, dark residences were a thing of the past. Haussmannian buildings had courtyards or small yards, and they often had bright, dual-aspect apartments with large windows.

    Haussmann Buildings

    The buildings contained independent apartments spread out over five to six floors. Each floor represented a different social class. The ground floor was occupied by shops. On the first floor — often referred to as the mezzanine, lived the merchants who owned the shops below. 

    The second (“piano nobile”) floor was reserved for the wealthy at the time. The prestigiousness decreases from bottom to top. The third and fourth floors are identical, and were usually reserved for the middle classes. The fifth floors were set back, usually housing the more modest social classes. A little balcony running along the length of the apartment makes up for having to climb to the top of the stairs, besides embellishing the façade. The sixth or top floor is where the “chambres de bonnes” were, for the servants. With lower ceilings and built under the eaves, the only access was by the back stairs.

    Paris Atelier Haussmann style

    When lifts were introduced in the early 20th century however, the hierarchy of the floors was reversed. Now, the 5th and 6th floors are the most sought-after as they have an unobstructed view of the rooftops of Paris and a clear view of the horizon that doesn’t have a price.

    Haussmann Characteristics

    Bright rooms, wooden floors, fireplaces and fine mouldings are just some of the attractive features of Haussmann apartments. With the exception of the kitchen and WCs, the flooring is almost always wood. The patterns most favored are herringbone, the brick pattern or “parquet de Versailles” motifs. 

    Parisian Haussmann Style

    These gorgeous wooden floors have been the defining characteristic of Parisian interior design through the ages. Additionally these are sometimes complemented by moldings, cornices, and simple or elaborate ceiling medallions. Wider baseboards, wainscoting or chair rail, and/or paneling on the walls adds a distinctive touch.  

    Decorating the Hausmann Home

    The typical Haussmannian style Parisian apartment is decorated in a blend of bold modern accompanied by an old-world refinement nevertheless with an easy flow between the two. Even while maintaining balance, the interior spaces follow the golden rule of – contrast and juxtapose styles, but do not erase them or blur the lines. 

    Modern Neo-Classical Style

    Another one of our 3 Most Popular European Styles is Modern Neo-Classical. The color scheme for Modern Neoclassical interiors is mostly white, cream, gray, pale yellow, blue, green, and other muted hues. However, Black, red, silver and gold are often used as accent colors. Most patterns feature low-contrast palettes. 

    3 most popular European styles - Haussmann, Modern Neo-Classical and Scandinavian
    Decorating the Modern Neoclassical home

    Modern Neoclassical Furniture has clean lines and simple symmetry. The style is marked by elegance and timelessness. Having said that, it is more modest compared to Traditional Neoclassical style. Nonetheless, there is an element of luxury in the elegant moldings, metal staircases, carved wood, antiques, and statues – both old and new.  Modern Neoclassical homes inspire visions of gathering and family in a more casual, unfussy way while still drawing on the understated opulence of its forbears. A mix of the old and new creates modern zen luxury with traditional roots. 

     Modern Neo-Classical style
    Scandinavian Style

    Last but not least of our 3 Most Popular European Styles is the Scandinavian Style. The primary characteristic – whether inspired by an Ikea catalog, or more high-end interiors, is that the style feels clean, crisp, yet calming.

    • The not-so-secret ingredient is Minimalism.
    • Scandinavian design emphasizes bright, light, and open spaces, with room to breathe within the space.
    • Choosing quality over quantity is a major trait of this style.
    • The other important trait is bringing nature inside.
    • The color scheme is usually neutral – often white with a pop or two of color that draws from nature – mostly soft blues and greens
    • Last but not least – clever use of contrast.
    Popular European styles - Haussmann, Modern Neo-Classical and Scandinavian style
    What is Hygge?

    Some people go for a version of Scandinavian style that is minimal almost to the point of monastic. But keep in mind this is not an invitation to live a Spartan life by any means. The success of this style is in being able to juxtapose the coolness of the white and what may be seen as uninviting clean lines need to be softened to a degree by introducing warmer textures and colors, and what may be defined as hygge. Hygge is a Danish word that roughly translates to cozy togetherness. How do you do Hygge?

    Popular European styles - Scandinavian

    Because Scandinavian design doesn’t involve a whole lot of color, a quick way to soften up a space is to introduce plants. One big plant with ample foliage in a minimalist concrete or wood container will do the trick. Another way to introduce coziness is to install a white area rug with a plush pile and add just a couple of pillows in a textured fabric. Add a set of minimalist Roman Shades at the window and you’re all set to hygge away in style.

    Photo Credits –

    Haussmann Style – Home Office photo courtesy Booking.com | Living Room with Black Velvet Club Chairs and leopard print rug photo courtesy Architectural Digest | Haussmann style Atelier photo Courtesy Financial Times |  Modern Neo Classical Style – Living Room with pair of tangerine velvet armchairs photo courtesy designbooks.com | Living Room with pair of white chairs and powder blue coffee table photo courtesy Elle Decor | Scandinavian style – Living Room photo courtesy departures.com | Scandinavian Dining Room photo courtesy – YLighting.com

    Category
    Home
    Discussion
    Share on
COME JOIN THE CLUB....!Best of Home | Garden | Food | Fashion

Tout le monde...!